Friday, January 27, 2006

"In our world instead of theirs..."

"Cyberspace" Is Dead
(Interviews by Alex Pang and David Pescovitz)

"Twenty years after William Gibson coined the term cyberspace in his novel Neuromancer, we live in a world of smart objects, always-on devices, and perpetually open information channels. The Internet feels less like an alternate world that we 'go to' and more like just another layer of life. Besides, doesn't cyberspace sound kind of played out?"

Vint Cerf, Internet Evangelist, Google
'I still like [Xerox PARC researcher] Mark Weiser's term ubiquitous computing. It's a world in which the computer would melt into the walls and furniture.'

Neil Gershenfeld, Director, MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms
'I'd vote for calling it the world. Information technologies are finally growing up, so we can interact with them in our world instead of theirs'."

And Gene Becker in response to Gershenfeld:

Me: Ah, Neil you brilliant dreamer. I really like the sentiment, but for most of us plain folk technology is not yet a normal, invisible, accepted part the world we live in. Besides, what fun is it if there's no cool new jargon to describe our cool new existence?

Heh heh.

And here's Jan Chipchase with another bit of futurism:

"Our team spends a lot of time working on concepts 3 to 5 years ahead of what appears on the market. I spent one year working on ideas up to 15 years ahead of where we are now - it's quite a tricky mental space to visit though fun when you get there. You know those wonderful visions of the future where everything is white an uncluttered? Trust me, the future will be messy, and wonderfully so."

When I read all of this, it finally sinks in why Steve "STS" Woolgar is a Professor of Marketing in the Sad Business School at Oxford. And why Latour's latest book is filed under organisation studies.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Ryan Shaw said...

"When I read all of this, it finally sinks in why Steve "STS" Woolgar is a Professor of Marketing in the Sad Business School at Oxford. And why Latour's latest book is filed under organisation studies."

Why? (It's not sinking in for me.)

05:35  
Blogger Anne said...

Well, it's not coincidental or irrelevant that this kind of rhetoric is heavily invested in marketing-hype, and that new technologies always already emerge within particular organisation(al) practices...

04:41  

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